Owen Lindley: Quaker Records Are the Key (52 Ancestors #46)

Owen Lindley, my sixth great grandfather, is another one of the Quakers who made the journey from Orange County, North Carolina to Orange County, Indiana in 1811.  He was the nephew of Jonathan Lindley and Deborah Dicks.  When I went back through my files to see what I had on him, I realized that was almost all I knew about Owen.

I began searching for him on Ancestry.  With their recently added Quaker records, I felt sure I would find something.  And I did.

Owen Lindley was born on the 9th day of the 6th month, 1763, in Orange County, North Carolina.1,2,3,5,6,7  His parents were Thomas and Sarah (Evans) Lindley.1,2,3,6  He married Sarah Thompson in 1784.3,4,5,7  They had six children:  James, Sarah, Martha, Thomas, Jonathan, and David (1797-1797).3,5,7  Sarah died in 1797, possibly due to complications from child birth, and Owen married Grace Chambers in 1798.3,6,7,8  Their children were Aran, Polly, Queen Amy, Elizabeth, Elenor, Grace, David, Owen, and Chambers.7,8

Owen died sometime between June 2, 1828 and July 21, 1828.7,8  He left a very detailed will, wherein he leaves his mare, Blaze, to his wife.8  I don’t know why, but I always enjoy reading about ancestors’ pets.  I suppose it makes them seem more alive to me.

The Annual Monitor for 1830 had a nice paragraph about him:

In early life he submitted to the baptizing power of Truth; and thereby was qualified to become a useful member of the Church.  In his last illness he forcibly expressed the interest he felt in the dear Redeemer.9

I’m very glad I was able to find this information on Owen Lindley.   I often get frustrated with Ancestry because they update so often and everything changes.  However, the addition of the Quaker records definitely made me very happy.  Without them, I wouldn’t have known much about Owen. Hopefully, I can continue to collect information on him.


Sources

  1. Ancestry.com. U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.  Guilford College; Greensboro, North Carolina; Records 1814, Volume 11; Collection: North Carolina.
  2. Ancestry.com.  U.S., Hinshaw Index to Selected Quaker Records, 1680-1940 (database on-line).  Provo, UT, USA:  Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
  3. Ancestry.com. U.S., Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol I–VI, 1607–1943 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.
  4. Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.
  5. Ancestry.com. U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.  Guilford College; Greensboro, North Carolina; Women’s Minutes, 1838-1885; Collection: North Carolina Yearly Meeting Minutes.
  6. Heritage Consulting. Millennium File [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.
  7. Brown, Roger. “Owen Lindley (1763-1828).” Find A Grave. Findagrave.com, 04 Sept. 2015. Web. 20 Nov. 2015. Find A Grave Memorial# 151843637.
  8. Ancestry.com. Indiana, Wills and Probate Records, 1798-1999 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.  Probate Records, 1816-1943; Author: Indiana. Circuit Court (Orange County); Probate Place: Orange, Indiana.
  9. Ancestry.com. U.S. and UK, Quaker Published Memorials, 1818-1919 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.

 

Deborah Dicks: Conviction and Courage (52 Ancestors #44)

It is 1811.  You are a Quaker woman living in North Carolina, a slave state.  You are anti-slavery.  In fact, your husband is an abolitionist.  One night, the two of you discuss what can be done about your situation.  Although North Carolina is your home, living in a place where a man, or woman, is considered less than another solely because of the color of their skin is unconscionable.  Something has to be done.  It is decided that you and your extended family will move to a free territory.  Your husband makes the necessary arrangements and discusses the plan with family and friends.  When the day arrives, you are one of 218 people traveling to Indiana territory.  This land is mostly wooded, and the Indians living there are often hostile.  It will take weeks to reach this new home, and a dwelling will have to be built upon arrival.

How terrifying must this have been?  I don’t know that I would have had that much courage, but Deborah (Dicks) Lindley did.  That was just part of her story.

Deborah Dicks was born on the tenth day of the tenth month in 1757.1,2,3  Her parents, Zacharias Dicks and Ruth Hiatt, were both Quaker ministers.1,2,3,4,5  She married Jonathan Lindley, a Quaker abolitionist, in 1775.2,3,4,5,6  They had twelve children.2,3,7,8

In 1811, seeking a life in a land free from slavery, Deborah, along with her husband, 29 other family members, 75 other Quakers, and many free black families, moved from her home in Orange County (now Alamance County), North Carolina to the wilderness of the Indiana territory.  Their original destination was Terre Haute.  Due to Indian discontent in that area, they settled further southeast of their original destination.  They named this area Orange County after their home county.2,3,4,5,8

Sadly, Deborah died on August 9, 1811, just a few weeks after her arrival.  Her grave is the first marked grave of a white woman in Orange County, Indiana.2,3,5,8

Jonathan and Deborah Lindley memorial stone with original tombstones on either side. Photo taken by Melissa Wiseheart, 28 Feb 2014.

Jonathan and Deborah Lindley memorial stone with original tombstones on either side. Photo taken by Melissa Wiseheart, 28 Feb 2014.


Sources

  1. Ancestry.com. U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.  Guilford College; Greensboro, North Carolina; Minutes, 1700-1900; Collection: North Carolina Yearly.
  2. “Deborah Dicks Lindley.” Find A Grave. Jacquie Cooksey, 07 Sept. 2006. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
  3. Dunaway, Stewart E. The Battle at Lindley’s Mill. Second ed. S.l.: Lulu, 2009. Print.
  4. Powell, William Samuel. Dictionary of North Carolina Biography. Vol. 4, L-O. Chapel Hill U.a.: U of North Carolina Pr., 1996. Print.
  5. McCormick, Mike. Terre Haute: Queen City of the Wabash. Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2005. Print.
  6. Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.
  7. Ancestry.com. U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.  Guilford College; Greensboro, North Carolina; Records 1814, Volume 11; Collection: North Carolina.
  8. Oslund, Nancy Lindley. “Jonathan Lindley: The Paoli Pioneer.” The INGenWeb Project. INGenWeb, Nov. 2003. Web. 26 Aug. 2015.

Mary L. Lindley: What Does the L. Stand For? (52 Ancestors #33)

Mary Lindley is another ancestor that has always fascinated me.  If I’m being honest, they all have, but I think everyone has a handful that are especially interesting for one reason or another.

Mary L. Lindley Springer, circa 1910. Photo courtesy of Susan Huber-Jourdan, FindAGrave.com

Mary L. Lindley Springer, circa 1910. Photo courtesy of Susan Huber-Jourdan, FindAGrave.com

Mary L. Lindley was born on March 13, 1839 in Paoli, Orange County, Indiana.1,2,3,4,5,6,8,9  Her parents were Samuel and Anna (Braxton) Lindley.8  She is descended from Jonathan Lindley, who founded Orange County in 1811.  He was her great great grandfather on her mother’s side and her great great great uncle on her father’s side.  It took me a minute, too.

Mary married John Alexander Springer on December 22, 1859 in Orange County.7  I believe they had eight children.  It’s hard to tell, as one census says she had seven children born to her with six still living and the next census says she had five or six children born to her with four still living.5,6  The named children I have come across are Anna L. (ca. 1864), Edward (ca. 1866), Mary E. (ca. 1867), Frank (ca. 1869), Charley (ca. 1873), Stella (ca. 1875), Mattie (ca. 1877), and John (ca. 1881).1,2,3,4,5,6,10,11  I do believe these are all of their children, based on census records, but also because Frank wrote about each one of his siblings at some time or another in letters to his wife and daughter.

Mary died of heart disease on January 18, 1916 in Paoli.8,9  This may be the end of her life, but it isn’t the end of the story.

Tombstone, John A. and Mary L. Springer, photo courtesy of Allen Helderman, 20 March 2015, FindAGrave.com.

Tombstone, John A. and Mary L. Springer, photo courtesy of Allen Helderman, 20 March 2015, FindAGrave.com.

As if the confusion over her bloodline and her children weren’t enough, there seems to be confusion over her middle name as well.  On the pedigree chart that my grandma gave to me years ago, she is written in as Mary Lumire Lindley.  Now, I’m what some people call a name nerd and unusual names are of great interest to me.  Why Lumire?  I looked into it and could not find a logical explanation.  I looked at other pedigree charts on several different genealogy websites and also found her middle name given as Lumiere, Lamira, and Lamiah.

Knowing that records were often written by other people listening to the pronunciation of a name, I can see how these could all sound the same with the regional accent.  The interesting thing is, I have yet to find her middle name on any official record.  She is always Mary or Mary L.  I began to look at the names on their own merit.  Lumire and Lumiere are not names that I’m familiar with, however, lumière does mean light in French.  I don’t believe the Lindleys have a French connection.  Lamiah (or Lamia) is from Greek mythology and would have been a possibility.  However, the Lindleys were Quakers and I don’t believe they would have used a name from Greek mythology.  This leaves me with Lamira.  Lamira was a name first used circa 1613 by John Fletcher in his play The Honest Man’s Fortune.  The name rose to popularity in New York in the 1780s and the popularity had probably spread west by the mid-1800s.12

In the absence of a document with a middle name on it, Lamira will be the name I pencil in on my charts.  As always, I’ll keep looking for proof.


Sources

  1.  1850 United States Federal Census. Ancestry.com, 2009. Web. 27 Dec. 2014. Paoli, Orange, Indiana. p.879. Family #324, lines 16-24.
  2. 1860 United States Federal Census. Ancestry.com, 2009. Web. 07 Mar. 2011. Paoli, Orange, Indiana. p.120. Family #921, lines 15-16.
  3. 1870 United States Federal Census. Ancestry.com, 2009. Web. 07 Mar. 2011. Paoli, Orange, Indiana. p.24. Family #176, lines 23-28.
  4. 1880 United States Federal Census. Ancestry.com, 2009. Web. 07 Mar. 2011. Paoli, Orange, Indiana. p.6B. Family #53, lines 17-25.
  5. 1900 United States Federal Census. Ancestry.com, 2009. Web. 27 Dec. 2014. Paoli, Orange, Indiana. pp.8A-8B. Family #165, lines 50-55.
  6. 1910 United States Federal Census. Ancestry.com, 2009. Web. 07 Mar. 2011. Paoli, Orange, Indiana. p.2A. Family #29, lines 24-27.
  7. “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KZCH-GFZ : accessed 15 August 2015), John A Springer and Mary Lindley, 22 Dec 1859; citing , Orange, Indiana, county clerk offices, Indiana; FHL microfilm 1,316,697.
  8. Orange County Health Department. Orange County, Indiana Deaths: book H-23, p.86. Issued 12 April 1979.
  9. “Deaths (Obituaries)” Paoli Republican 19 January 1916, Wednesday ed.: 6. Print. column 2.  Accessed 27 Dec. 2014, NewspaperArchive.com.
  10. Springer, Frank. “Various Letters.” Letter to Ella Rakestraw Springer. N.d. MS. In My Possession, New Albany, Indiana. Inclusive dates: 1892-1893.
  11. Springer, Frank. “Various Letters.” Letter to Mildred Springer Wiseheart. N.d. MS. In My Possession, New Albany, Indiana. Inclusive dates: 1905-1925.
  12. “Lamira.” Behind the Name: Meaning of Names, Baby Name Meanings. N.p., 03 July 2014. Web. 18 Aug. 2015.

Jonathan Lindley: From Orange County to Orange County (52 Ancestors #08)

I haven’t done any real research on my Lindley line yet.  I suppose I always thought they’re fairly well documented and it will all still be there when I’m ready.  Jonathan Lindley was my sixth great grandfather and my eighth great uncle.  I am descended from his daughter, Hannah, and his nephew, Owen.  My grandpa told me a story about Jonathan Lindley on more than one occasion.

In the spring of 1811, Jonathan Lindley and his wife, she was Deborah Dicks (or Dix), moved their whole family and a large number of freed slaves from North Carolina up here to Indiana, up in Orange County.  They were Quakers, see, and they didn’t believe that people should be slaves.  They wanted to make sure that these freed slaves got up here safely.  They also wanted to live in a state where slavery was illegal.  I don’t know exactly how many went or what all their names were, but one of them freed slaves was called Alexander Polecat.  He was a character.  Always crackin’ jokes.

When they got to the Ohio River, they had to camp a while on the Kentucky side.  The water was too high to cross, see.  So, they camped there the first night and everything was fine, but the next mornin’, Jonathan Lindley’s dog was missin’.  Well they looked around and they called for him but he never did come, so they figured he must’ve been scared off by an animal or somethin’.  Some time later, they got a letter from an old neighbor down in North Carolina sayin’ the dog come home.  Now, isn’t that somethin’, a dog findin’ his way back home all those miles?

In February of 2014, I went to Orange County, Indiana with my dad.  We stopped at Lick Creek Friends Cemetery to see Jonathan and Deborah Lindley’s memorial stone.

Jonathan and Deborah Lindley memorial stone with original tombstones on either side.  Photo taken by Melissa Wiseheart, 28 Feb 2014.

Jonathan and Deborah Lindley memorial stone with original tombstones on either side. Photo taken by Melissa Wiseheart, 28 Feb 2014.

I will get around to researching the Lindleys.  My focus, for the moment, is telling the stories of those ancestors whose lives are relatively unknown.